Why I Wrote the Novel, “Fires of Greenwood”

firesbookDid you know that on the morning of June 1, 1921, over 7500 White Tulsans crossed over the Frisco railroad tracks into the African American section of the city and slaughtered over 300 men, women, and children?

Did you know that kerosene soaked explosives were dropped from low flying airplanes onto the African American community that same morning? It was the very first time that planes had been used to destroy people and property within the continental United States.

Did you know that every business building and all homes were fire bombed and burned to the ground in a 34 block radius of Black Wall Street?

Did you know that after the attack, approximately 7,000 African American citizens were locked up in a concentration camp environment in their own country?

Did you know that the Black Veterans of World War I put up such a valiant fight that the racists in Tulsa never attempted to lynch another Black man in that city?

Did you know that out of the carnage and destruction rose a number of courageous Black men and women who we all should, today, consider our heroes?

If you had no knowledge of the Tulsa Riot of 1921, then you should make it a priority to purchase, Fires of Greenwood, an outstanding fictionalized version of that triumph and tragedy that happened on June 1, 1921, in the community known as Black Wall Street, in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

 

The novel is available on Amazon.com or Barnes and Noble.com or if you would like an autographed copy, please contact the author, Frederick Williams at fredwilliams@satx.rr.com.

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2 Comments

Filed under Black Literature

2 responses to “Why I Wrote the Novel, “Fires of Greenwood”

  1. This is so great. I love and appreciate what you are doing for the literary industry. You are making a big difference.

  2. Frederick, I got your book. Thanks so much for sending it. Perfect timing. I’m taking it on a trip…Happy New Year. Let’s keep in touch – I need help with my book too.
    Laurel Stradford

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